“Good Christian women leaders/people ought to stay in their place. Disruption always does more harm than good, and legacy is reserved for the rich.”    Lies, lies and more lies. If, like me, you’d bought into that narrative, you’ve been misled.     For the past few years, I’ve been captivated by the stories of two men:
“We delight in the beauty of the butterfly, but rarely admit the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty.” -Maya Angelou    The kind of legacy we leave will only reflect the kind of life we lived. Seems obvious, but there is a bit of irony in our tendency to romanticize the leaving,
    We live in a culture that sensationalizes “purpose”. Somehow, we’ve come to believe that this illusive concept is the missing link to an assurance of fulfillment, riches, and comfort. However, anyone who has embarked on a journey to find their purpose knows that the quest is not an easy one. It’s often laced
      I grew up believing a lie. As a Christian, much of what I accept as truth is based on faith – belief that the Bible is the infallible Word of God, and that my experiences are a small part of a story that is unfolding to His glory. That’s not the lie.
    I turned 30 recently, and truth be told, it’s all been very anticlimactic. I don’t actually feel different, but there is a constant awareness that I am older and I should feel different. A big part of this is because I spent my 29th birthday having a pity party in anticipation of turning 30. Silly, I