False faith is not the antidote to the coronavirus. However, that hasn’t stopped thousands of pastors and leaders.

 

Many have posted on their social media, ‘just have faith’ and ‘trust Jesus’.

 

However, putting your head in the sand does not equal faith. It equals foolishness.

 

“Just have faith,” “fear not,” and “do not fear,” are great sayings. 

 

BUT

 

None of these platitudes are going to keep someone from getting the coronavirus. They might increase your tithe. They might even keep the lights on in your sanctuary. But they won’t ease the valid fears of those within your congregation.

 

Yes. For the average person, this virus will only minimally impact them. However, for millions of older adults, individuals with compromised immune systems, cancer patients, and children with underlying health conditions, this reality is truly dangerous.

 

Therefore, every post, every sermon, and every piece of advice that you state on Sunday morning is damaging half of your congregation.

 

Many church sermons center on the idea of “Loving your neighbor as yourself.”

 

How is it loving to endanger people?

 

How is it loving to perpetuate messages that encourage people to “prove their faith” through foolishness?

 

There’s nothing wrong with encouraging people to “not fear”. However, this message should not come at the cost of putting someone else’s life in jeopardy.

 

Again, there is no need to be anxious about the coronavirus, but there is also no need to be foolish in the name of “faith” and “Christianity”!

 

Read more: 5 Ways that Rachel Held Evans Gave Hope to the Church

 

God is not giving you brownie points for encouraging people to “just” trust God and live without wisdom. Faith is not an excuse to be unwise.

 

 

Why do I write this?

 

Discrimination in all forms is wrong.

 

This includes discrimination against ethnicities. Right now, the amount of bias and hate towards Asians is increasing and detrimental. It needs to stop. Fear is not an excuse for being discriminatory against an entire people group.

 

The same is true for people with compromised immune systems or underlying health conditions.

 

When you have a compromised immune system, you’re cautious about any virus. You wash your hands, wear a mask, stay indoors, shop later at night, or keep away from crowds. People with immune disorders do this every flu season.

 

 

So, What Should you Do?

 

If your a Christian pastor or leader, don’t belittle, mock, or judge someone who’s cautious. Ask intelligent questions, respect their choices, and allow their choice to differ from your own.

 

Direct people on your social media to the CDC and WHO for practical updates.

 

Again, faith is not an excuse to be unwise. Just look at Joseph and Noah.

 

Both of these leaders truly took a step of faith. And both were ridiculed.

 

Joseph prepared for a 7-year famine.

 

Noah built an Ark.

 

So, instead of mocking those in your church that are preparing for their “ark” or preparing for their “famine”, maybe you should ask yourself if you actually believe what you preach.

 

After all, Noah and Joseph didn’t have many supporters.

 

And they were living by faith.

 

Follow Me!
Colleen Batchelder"> Colleen Batchelder
Colleen Batchelder has always been passionate about putting Feet to her Faith! She loves traveling the globe minstering at various churches, colleges and conferences speaking to audiences ranging in age from 9 – 101. She speaks on inter-generational communication, reaching millennials within the workplace and church and breaking down generational assumptions. When she’s not pouring over books, you can find her enjoying a nice Chai Latte, exploring NYC or traveling to a new and exotic destination.

Leave A Comment